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RAEANNE RUBENSTEIN

 

Muhammad Ali playfully snapped fierce punches within inches of her face. Andy Warhol, for several years, invited her to join him at events, at home, and in his art studio. Jerry Lee Lewis interrupted a photo shoot to lead her on a tour of his twin-engine airplane and surprise her with an unplanned trip. Charlie Rich whisked her into his Cadillac and drove from Memphis to rural Arkansas, built a bonfire on the farm where he was born, and spun stories until dawn. Rodney Dangerfield climbed from his pool, turned to look at her with bugged-out eyes, and bared his buns.

 

In a five-decade career, photographer Raeanne Rubenstein captured the famous and the infamous in one-of-a-kind images that trace American entertainment from the grainy, turbulent 1960s to the digital gloss of a new century. With her plucky, engaging personality, Rubenstein inspired thousands of celebrities to reveal themselves to her in real and refreshing ways.

 

Her images appeared in the most successful publications of her time, including Life, People, Rolling Stone, and Time. She has published more than ten books, including several on country music. Her work has been exhibited in Dublin, London, Los Angeles, Nashville, New York, and beyond. Her list of subjects includes Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Federico Fellini, Jimi Hendrix, Dustin Hoffman, Waylon Jennings, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Willie Nelson, Gram Parsons, Dolly Parton, Lou Reed, and Tanya Tucker—to name only a small percentage.

 

A graduate of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, Rubenstein began her career in the 1960s as a fashion photographer in London before returning to her native New York, where she befriended Warhol and photographed actors, directors, models, and, most of all, musicians. She took her first work trip to Nashville in 1975, eventually moving to the Tennessee capital, where she founded the celebrity magazine Dish.

 

“I’ve always had a deep-seated fascination with interesting people,” Rubenstein said. “I figured if I got to know them in a visual way, other people could get to know them too.”

 

 
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